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Water School

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What is the water cycle?

What is the water cycle?

Rainfall that stays in the liquid state becomes runoff that makes up streams and rivers.  Water that is not used for some purpose eventually flows to the ocean.  Water that evaporates from the oceans then condenses and eventually falls back to Earth in the form of rain. This is also known as the hydrologic cycle.The water cycle is the continuous movement of water in the atmosphere, over the land, and in the ocean. Through precipitation, water condenses, forming a liquid and falling to ...
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What is an acre-foot?

An acre-foot is commonly used to measure water volume. It is the amount of water needed to cover one acre (43,560 square feet) with one foot of water.  One acre foot is equal to 325,851 gallons of water.
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Can I pump water from the river to water my lawn?

In Texas, surface-water rights are governed by duel doctrine that take widely differing approaches: riparian and appropriation. The riparian doctrine was introduced to Texas more than 200 years ago during the Spanish colonial period and has since incorporated elements of English common law.Under this doctrine, property owners have a right to draw water from a stream or water body that crosses or borders their land. They are allowed to take water for a reasonable use and are protected against unr...
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What is greywater?

Greywater is wastewater from household or small commercial establishments that includes water from clothes washing machines, showers and bathtubs, and sinks used for hand washing.  Greywater does not include water from the kitchen sink used in the cleaning of food and from toilets, dishwashers, or water used for washing diapers.In some areas, greywater may be released into the environment without going through a treatment process. Texas laws prohibit the release of greywater into or near lakes s...
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Are there different kinds of bottled water?

Artesian, spring, well and ground water comes from an underground aquifer and may or may not be treated. Well and artesian water are tapped through a well.Spring water is collected as it flows to the surface, and ground water can be either.Distilled water comes from steam from boiling water that is condensed. Distilling kills microbes and removes minerals, giving water a “flat” taste.Drinking water is simply intended for human consumption and can come from a variety of sources, including publi...
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What is the difference between water from my faucet and bottled water?

The main difference in the water from your faucet and bottled water is the source. Water from your faucet comes from a local source, where ground or surface water is treated for contaminants at a municipal plant before it is sent through pipes to your home. In the case of some rural residents, their water is drawn directly from the ground through nearby wells.Bottled water can come from a wide variety of sources ranging from artesian wells to public water supplies anywhere across the country. Wh...
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Where does my water come from?

Your water comes from either a nearby reservoir, stream, or from groundwater.  Where your water originates depends largely on where you live. Water sources can vary between surface water and ground at different locations within a relatively small geographical area. Many municipalities blend both surface water and groundwater together before sending it to your home.The State of Texas requires that your water provider inform you of where your water originates.  Most providers send t...
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Besides drinking, how is water used?

There are many other uses for water besides that used for drinking. Water is used for agricultural, industrial, environmental, and other municipal purposes. Municipal use includes supplies to homes and businesses (including schools and prisons) as well as industrial or commercial purposes. Numerous municipal needs range from sanitation and sewage systems to food preparation and landscape watering.Water is used in industry for many the manufacturing processes that require rinsing or cooling....
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The information provided on this site is intended as background on water within the Brazos River basin. There should be no expectation that this information is all encompassing, complete or in any way examines every aspect of this very complex natural resource.

If you have questions about a post or would like additional information, please contact us or call 888-922-6272.

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