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What is a perpetual water right?

A perpetual water right (also called a Certificate of Adjudication) is a permit issued by the State of Texas that does not have an expiration date.  It specifies a volume of water that may be used on an annual basis.  This water may be used for consumptive purposes or may be stored and consumptively used on an annual basis.The permit specifies a priority date for use but does not guarantee that water will always be available.  Perpetual rights are considered property interests and may be bought,...
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What is "domestic and livestock" use?

Domestic and Livestock use is available only to those whose property adjoins a stream or river.  This use is for water utilized by livestock, household needs and to irrigate a yard or home garden.  This same exemption to Texas water rights allows property owners to impound or store water in stock tanks on larger than 200 acre-feet of storage volume.
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Must I obtain permission to use Texas surface water?

Yes, permission is required in order to ensure that there is enough water for all in need.  The state has established procedures and requirements for obtaining access to state surface water.  Water use may be sought through application for a state permit through the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ) or through the contract purchase of water from an already permitted entity.The Brazos River Authority holds numerous state issued permits for water use and provides this water to other...
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What is Texas Water Planning?

Water planning in Texas is the process where officials take a long-term look at Texas’ water needs and how to meet them. The current method of water planning stems from the passage of Senate Bill 1 by the 75th Texas Legislature in 1997. This bill set as its goals providing for the development, management and conservation of water resources and preparation for responding to drought conditions.The planning process takes place to ensure that sufficient water will be available for reasonable cost f...
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What are invasive plants?

Invasive plants are non-native, typically exotic plants that thrive when introduced into areas where they have no predators or disease control. They quickly reproduce and grow unchecked, crowding out native species that use the same habitat. Some examples of invasive plants in Texas include the Chinaberry tree, running bamboo and kudzu vine.Invasive water plants have a direct impact on Texas lakes.  Plants such as giant salvinia, a floating plant native to Brazil, is especially harmful as it gro...
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The information provided on this site is intended as background on water within the Brazos River basin. There should be no expectation that this information is all encompassing, complete or in any way examines every aspect of this very complex natural resource.

If you have questions about a post or would like additional information, please contact us or call 888-922-6272.

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