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Besides drinking, how is water used?

There are many other uses for water besides that used for drinking. Water is used for agricultural, industrial, environmental, and other municipal purposes. Municipal use includes supplies to homes and businesses (including schools and prisons) as well as industrial or commercial purposes. Numerous municipal needs range from sanitation and sewage systems to food preparation and landscape watering.Water is used in industry for many the manufacturing processes that require rinsing or cooling....
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What are total dissolved solids?

Total dissolved solids or TDS is the amount of minerals that remain when a water sample is completely evaporated, such as the water spots on your glasswear.  TDS is a measurement of all organic and sometimes inorganic solids in water and is reported as milligrams per liter (mg/l). TDS includes elements and organic compounds such as calcium, magnesium, potassium, sodium, bicarbonates, chlorides, and sulfates.  TDS is used as a general indicator of water quality.
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What does brackish mean?

Brackish is a term used to describe water that contains more dissolved minerals (see total dissolved solids) than normally acceptable for municipal, domestic and agricultural uses. It has a higher amount of dissolved solids than fresh water but not as high as saltier types such as sea water.Brackish water includes concentrations of total dissolved solids (TDS) ranging from 1,000 to 10,000 milligrams per liter (mg/l).
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What are the benefits of wetlands?

Wetlands provide a habitat for a variety of plants and animals that would fare poorly in other environments. They also provide water storage, functioning like a sponge, storing water and slowly releasing it. This helps ease water’s potential for flooding and erosion. The slow release also contributes to surface water flow during dry periods.Wetlands also can act as a natural water filtration system. As the water enters the wetland, its movement slows around plants, which allows suspended sedime...
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What type of water transportation systems does the Brazos River Authority operate?

The BRA operates two pipeline systems that transport water from reservoir storage to areas where it is needed. The Williamson County Regional Water Line carries raw water from Lake Stillhouse Hollow to Lake Georgetown, serving the residents of Georgetown, Round Rock, and the Brushy Creek Municipal Utility District. The East Williamson County Water Transmission Line moves water supply from Lake Granger to a potable water treatment plant.
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How many potable water treatment plants are run by the Brazos River Authority and whom do they serve?

The Brazos River Authority owns and operates the East Williamson County Regional Water System serving the cities of Taylor, Hutto and Thrall, the Jonah Special Utilities District and the Nowak Water Supply Company. The BRA also contracts to operate the Sandy Creek Water Treatment Plant in Leander and the Lee County Fresh Water Supply District No. 1, serving the community of Dime Box.
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How many wastewater treatment plants are run by the Brazos River Authority and whom do they serve?

The Brazos River Authority operates the Temple-Belton Wastewater Treatment System as well as wastewater treatment centers for the cities of Hutto, Sugar Land, Dime Box, Clute and Richwood. Other operations include the Brushy Creek Regional Wastewater System, which serves the cities of Round Rock, Cedar Park, Austin and the Fern Bluff and Brushy Creek municipal utility districts.
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What is the Brazos River basin?

The Brazos River basin covers a swath across Texas more than 600 miles long, beginning near the Texas-New Mexico Border and ending at the Gulf of Mexico in Brazoria County.The basin includes all or part of 70 Texas counties within 42,000 square miles and includes numerous smaller tributary rivers including the Double Mountain, Salt and Clear Forks, the Paluxy, Bosque, Nolan, Little, and Navasota Rivers and dozens of smaller rivers and tributaries.For a full-sized map, click here.
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The information provided on this site is intended as background on water within the Brazos River basin. There should be no expectation that this information is all encompassing, complete or in any way examines every aspect of this very complex natural resource.

If you have questions about a post or would like additional information, please contact us or call 888-922-6272.

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