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Possum Kingdom Lake
Frequently Asked Questions
General


Call 9-1-1. The county dispatcher will contact the lake rangers and/or emergency medical services.

Violations such as illegal dumping, unsafe boating, boating/swimming accidents or other illegal activity should be reported to the BRA immediately.

Call the Brazos River Authority at (940) 529-2141 during normal working hours (Monday thru Friday, 8 a.m. - 5 p.m., excluding holidays).

After regular business hours, contact the Palo Pinto County Sheriff's Office at (940) 659-2085. The sheriff's office dispatcher has radio contact with the Lake Rangers and can refer your call to them.

Due to increased security efforts to protect public safety, tours are not available to the general public.

The water in the main body of the lake meets standards for contact recreation. However, no surface water is entirely safe for all people, as all surface water contains bacteria that can be hazardous depending on exposure level and the health of the individual. For additional information on waterborne illnesses, click here.

Possum Kingdom lake rangers work schedules vary for a number of reasons. Additionally, their time is typically spent in the field, or on the water, rather than in the office. If you call (940) 779-2321 and leave a message, your call will be returned. If it is an emergency, please call Palo Pinto County Sherriff dispatcher at (940) 659-2085 or 9-1-1.

No, fishing licenses are the responsibility of the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department. To learn more about licenses and where to obtain them, click here.

If you see a fish kill, please call the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department’s Kills and Spills Hotline at (512) 389-4848 or (281) 842-8100. To see the status of a golden algae bloom go here.

No, Texas law requires all motorized boats, regardless of length, be registered and the certificate of numbers must always be aboard and available for inspection by an enforcement officer. You can learn more about Texas boating registration and laws by going here.

No, the State of Texas requires that all watercraft be registered with the state. For more information on boat registration and titles, click here.

A drawing for waterfowl hunting site permits is held toward the end of August each year. Anyone that would like to obtain a waterfowl hunting site permit must be present at the lake office to personally enter their name on the day of the drawing. The permits are awarded through a lottery-style drawing as a one-year use permit. Hunters that receive a permit through this process must have a valid state hunting permit and must supply their own blinds. Up to three registered hunters may utilize the blind site for the permit period. If fewer entries are received than the number of available sites, the remaining sites will be available on a first come/first serve basis. For dates and times of upcoming waterfowl hunting blind drawings, please contact the PK lake office at 940-779-2321.

All-terrain vehicles (ATVs), utility terrain vehicles (UTVs), dirt bikes, or golf carts are not allowed on most BRA property including the lake bed, river bed, public use areas, or PK trails. Some commercial camps allow UTVs and golf carts on the roads within their camp. For more information on particular commercial camp rules, contact the camp operator directly.

Lake elevation is measured according to mean sea level (msl) by the United States Geological Survey (USGS). Both historic and real-time readings via reports recorded every 15 minutes on the USGS website. Real-time readings for BRA reservoirs may be found on the BRA website home page at www.brazos.org.

The top of the Morris Sheppard Dam is measured at 1,000 feet msl. Possum Kingdom Lake is considered to be “full” at 999.0 msl.

Like other BRA lakes, Possum Kingdom is a water supply reservoir and is therefore intended to save water during times of plenty for use in times of need, such as drought. To maintain an ample water supply, the BRA attempts to keep the lake as full as possible; however, the lake level will vary, depending on the amount of water used, evaporation rates, amounts of rainfall and runoff in the Brazos basin upstream, and other factors. The level at times may drop substantially below full.